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For all enquiries, please don’t hesitate to phone Stable Equestrian on 01772 600555, email enquiries@stable-equestrian.net. Alternatively you can complete the online contact form below and we will reply as soon as possible.

Lisa Smith can be contacted on 07821 782135.

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    Have you ever hit a wall with a young horse you’ve been working with?

    on May 10, 2021 in Riders blog, Timothy Showe | Comments Off on Have you ever hit a wall with a young horse you’ve been working with?

    Have you ever hit a wall with a young horse you’ve been working with?

    April 16th Have you ever hit a wall with a young horse you’ve been working with? To the point you’ve just about or did throw your hands up and quit? Having been training horses for 21 years I have hit that said wall more times that I can count. I’ve come to realize that 85% of the time it’s not the horse that hits the wall. To prevent from being the reason we hit a wall with our colts I’ve thought of a few things that we can do. For starters before we even step in their stall we need to clear our minds of all distractions. When I say distraction I’m saying our minds and what’s going through them. Horses feed off energy that we have running from us. Now before you say oh that’s not possible think about it, a horse can feel a fly land on his tail head on a windy day, so yes they can feel our energy when we are around. Clear your mind, be free of the troubles your going through, don’t let the job you have that you hate go into the round pen with you. Don’t let the fight you had with your best friend come out when your working the areas you’ve notice need to be improved. The walls we hit in training a horse are because we unconsciously create them. A little saying I try to live by as a trainer is “ never set your horse up for failure, make sure you have given them the tools to be confident to succeed in what we ask of them.” Having counted our heard a few days ago that is one of the most important things to remember when dealing with 130 horses. Hope you enjoyed my thoughts on this subject and hope it helps also. Until next time, Ride correct and God bless TC Showe Follow...

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    Clowning around with Tim Holmes….

    on May 9, 2021 in Riders blog, Tim Holmes | Comments Off on Clowning around with Tim Holmes….

    Clowning around with Tim Holmes….

    Ok it’s that time again… Hope this note finds everyone of my readers doing well healthy and ready for an amazing summer. Here lately I’ve been just working and helping my wife take pictures on weekends for couples and families. Also working on new acts and gags when I get time. It has been a very busy spring so far but counting the days till I travel to the first rodeo of the year. If I was to give advice for anyone going to take up rodeo clowning I would say get to know an established clown, help him and go watch rodeos to figure out timing of the flow of rodeo and pay attention to how announcer talk to crowds. Hope you stay safe have a great rest of your spring and here’s to a great summer and upcoming rodeo season! Follow...

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    A Catch up with KP Ranch..Rodeos are starting!!

    on May 9, 2021 in Kevin Peck, Riders blog | Comments Off on A Catch up with KP Ranch..Rodeos are starting!!

    A Catch up with KP Ranch..Rodeos are starting!!

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    Fibre and Fructans; The Keyflow Guide to Managing Laminitis

    on May 3, 2021 in Articles, Health & nutrition | Comments Off on Fibre and Fructans; The Keyflow Guide to Managing Laminitis

    Fibre and Fructans; The Keyflow Guide to Managing Laminitis

    This week we wanted to remind you that after the glorious sunshine and some much needed spring showers the grass is growing! Great for our fields to finally recover following a very wet and muddy winter, but for those horses who are at risk of laminitis, it is time to consider their management. We are experiencing a sudden increase in advice calls and online requests for support with horses and ponies at risk or suffering from laminitis. The long cold winter, followed by an extreme lack of rain has led to particularly ’stressed grazing’. Grass stores sugar that is unable to be used for growth (due to cold or drought for example) in a form called fructan, that cannot be digested in the horses stomach and absorbed in the small intestine. It passes into the hindgut, causing a significant drop in the pH, leading to the death of the beneficial microorganisms and an increase in the production of lactic acid. Toxins are released and an inflammatory response triggered, leasing to an increased risk of laminitis and colic. Laminitis myth buster! ‘Only little chunky ponies get laminitis!’ All horses and ponies can develop laminitis! Laminitis can affect horses of all shapes and sizes!Horses with metabolic disorders such as Cushings (PPID), Insulin Dysregulation and EMS (Equine Metabolic System), may have a greater risk of developing laminitis. These conditions do occur in ALL breeds, and we are experiencing a rise in the number of sports and performance horses affected. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE…The Keyflow Advice and Support Teamkeyflowfeeds.comUK 01672 519000advice@keyflowfeeds.com Follow...

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    Understanding your horses Respiratory System – Synovium Uk

    on Apr 30, 2021 in Articles, Health & nutrition | Comments Off on Understanding your horses Respiratory System – Synovium Uk

    Understanding your horses Respiratory System – Synovium Uk

    The respiratory system is extremely important for your horse, especially competition horses, where a compromised respiratory system can limit or end a horse’s athletic career. It is an extremely large organ which primarily works to exchange oxygen for carbon dioxide which is distributed in the blood around the body. The respiratory system consists of both the large and small airways and the horse’s lungs. When a horse breathes in, air travels down the trachea, which divides into the right and left bronchi tubes, then into the smaller airways called bronchioles, located in the lungs. The bronchioles end in the small sacs called alveoli, where the barrier between the air and the blood is a thin membrane. Did you know? Horses are nasal breathers and do not usually breathe through their mouths. Because of this, the horse’s nasal passages are partially large and can expand a lot during strenuous exercise to increase the intake of air required. Respiratory-related health conditions are the second-leading cause of poor performance in athletic horses. At a canter / gallop, horses take one breath in time with each stride. This is referred to as respiratory-locomotory coupling. So, when something affects the horse’s breathing it has the potential to shorten the horses stride., therefore effecting performance. Why does Respiratory disorders occur? Lung and respiratory disorders are often caused by virus infections, bacteria, fungi, or inhalation of irritants or toxic substances. Viral respiratory infections can have a lasting effect on the respiratory systems defence mechanisms, making the horse more susceptible to further problems. Inflammatory airway disease is known for causing excessive mucus in the airways and poor performance in young horses. Often due to viral respiratory infections, allergies, and environmental factors. Reactive airway disease (heaves) is triggered by exposure to dusts, mainly in older horses that are susceptible to allergic airways disease. Signs of respiratory disease Discharge from the nose (mucus, pus, or blood, depending on the cause)Coughing (Including dry coughing or including mucus or blood)Rapid breathing while at restLaboured breathing; shortness of breath or discomfortHead shaking or abnormally low head carriage.Noisy breathing Managing Respiratory disorders in horses Firstly, you should always seek advice from your vet if you are concerned about your horse’s respiratory system. Your vet can help diagnose the underlining issue and help treat the problem. Vets can help by controlling infection, thinning secretions, and when possible, improving drainage and removing any infectious material. Vets can also provide expectorants (which help an animal to cough up the secretions), cough suppressants, bronchodilators (to help open airways), antibiotics and diuretics (to reduce fluid build- up). However, environmental factors and managing care are especially important to aid recovery and help prevent re occurring issues. Clean and dust free stables which are well ventilated should be provided for all horses. A natural supplement aid can also be given to help symptoms of respiratory diseases, such as coughing and excess mucus build up. Ideal for when horses have on going respiratory issues, recovering from a respiratory disease or to help support horses with allergies. Synovium® Airplus Liquid has been carefully developed by leading vets to help support horses with respiratory disorders. The unique formula contains all-natural ingredients know for supporting optimal functioning of the respiratory system. Containing Potassium iodide, Eucalyptus oil, Rosemary, Thyme and Aniseed all known for effectively clearing the airways and excess mucus whilst helping to sooth...

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    Pegasus Jewellery Vitality Bracelet

    on Apr 29, 2021 in Articles, Health & nutrition, Holistic | Comments Off on Pegasus Jewellery Vitality Bracelet

    Pegasus Jewellery Vitality Bracelet

    It’s almost 5 years since Pegasus Jewellery launched the original Vitality Bracelet. Combining magnetic therapy into a colourful silicon bracelet. The Vitality collection has grown from bracelets into a complete range of magnetic jewellery lined all over the world.  Now they have added a stunning copper bangle to the collection. Copper  has been recorded since ancient times of having healing properties and particularly effective for arthritis sufferers. The new copper torc bangle has  hidden vitality magnets to work alongside the body helping with inflammation and pain relief, as well as increasing blood flow and boosting energy levels. The rose gold effect copper is complimented with five coloured enamel finishes, resulting in a beautiful piece of therapeutic jewellery. https://pegasusjewellery.net/collections/what-s-new/products/new-vitality-bangle-white Follow...

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    Opinionated and judgemental comments – Sue Chapplehow- Lacey talks about Social Media in her blog…

    on Apr 26, 2021 in Riders blog, Sue Chapplehow-Lacey | Comments Off on Opinionated and judgemental comments – Sue Chapplehow- Lacey talks about Social Media in her blog…

    Opinionated and judgemental comments – Sue Chapplehow- Lacey talks about Social Media in her blog…

    Over the last few weeks I have been really disappointed to see overly opinionated and judgemental comments on social media. I wonder if the writers know how hurtful they are being.   My team isn’t just about the horses getting out there and competing, it is a little family.   We all have different challenges to contend with behind-the-scenes and getting to a show is pure relief.  We can close the door on these and have a few hours away from all the turmoil and stress. Within our group we have a stage four cancer sufferer, one that has a bedridden mother who is dying and they have to be there 99% carer, one who has has suicidal thoughts and self harm, another who struggles with self-confidence and low self esteem.  We choose to continue living our lives keeping our troubles hidden. I’m sure we are not alone.  I’m sharing today to ask that  people to be more considerate and thoughtful before writing comments.  It’s hurtful!  You really have no idea what is hiding behind another person’s smile. Social media can be very useful in many ways but also bare in mind 99% people only post the good moments. It’s a snapshot shot of what they want you to see. Is it the reality or is a cover up to what may be going on in their lives? Truthfully we don’t know. On a much lighter note I am so proud of Millie and Drumany. Both have had a few first experiences in the last couple of weeks.Millie did her first BSPS working hunter gaining a third in the 143 open, unfortunately had a pole in the novice. Then she went on to do her first flat show, qualified for the NPS National Championships in the five-year-old class, the novice Picton and the sparket at sparkle championship show. She also did an arena event, coming in third place and qualified for the northern equine events Championships held at Dalston Green in May. Millie and Sue Chapplehow – Lacey As for Drumany … We did our first horse trials.  This may not sound like a lot but going from a horse, a year ago, that constantly bolted, to being able to stay within the boards of the dressage test, I was very proud. It wasn’t a pretty test, it was very tense but equally not a disaster.  I went with the goal of just staying within the boards and starting and finishing.  We did it and completed.  I must add this was actually the first time I had ridden in an open space with just a snaffle bit. Showjumping was a little disappointed, she was exceedingly keen and didn’t really see the point in picking her feet up, so we did have two down. The cross country; oh my!  She was a machine, absolutely fabulous! I have entered a couple more events on her. Although she needs the mileage, I have actually put her up a level as I felt the small fences were hindering her and encouraging her to rush. I have to accept if we do have a few blips cross country, when something is a little bit more technical, it’s all down to mileage and that’s what this season is about for both of my horses. Drumany and Sue out...

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    Feed for Need – Condition

    on Apr 26, 2021 in Articles, Health & nutrition | Comments Off on Feed for Need – Condition

    Feed for Need – Condition

    The sunshine has arrived (for now!) although there is some spring grass emerging, many horse owners are struggling with their horse’s condition, having had an long cold, wet winter has impacted the grass growth. Many areas are still seeing temperatures as low as freezing and frosts overnight. Ensuring your horse has access to appropriate levels of appropriate forage is one of Keyflow’s priorities. On average a horse or pony requires 2% of their body weight in forage per day. So for an average 500kg horse that is 10kg of forage per day! This will vary depending on individual requirements. This forage can be made up of hay/ haylage/ grass/ chaff/pre ground or soaked mash fibre. Ensuring our horses have an efficient and effective gut to allow them to digest the fibre is vital – using Pink Mash to provide additional fibre and Protexin probiotics and prebiotics can do just that! A happy, healthy gut microbiome is vital for effective digestion of the fibre we are feeding! If you are struggling with a lack of grass or shortage of hay/haylage please contact us so we can suggest some ways to help.Pink Mash, along with other ‘bagged fibre sources’ such as unmolassed sugar beet and grass nuts can also be used and counted as a forage source and as a partial hay replacement. For horses who we are wishing to improve their condition- providing ad-lib forage is ideal, it also supports the natural behaviour of the horse.Making sure your horse is receiving a balanced diet with access to his or her daily essential nutrients such as vitamins and minerals is just as crucial to a horse needing to lose or gain condition. Using a balancer or a complete feed is a great way of ensuring this. Complete feeds such as Keyflow Stay Cool provide additional calories due to the higher feeding rate than that of a balancer. Get in touch with our friendly Keyflow Nutritional Advice team if you want to give your horse’s diet a new season assessment!If your horse is receiving a balanced diet with a great level of fibre but still needs condition, we can look to adding in calorie dense options to ‘top up’ the diet. Keyflow Key-Plus is a steam extruded stabilised rice bran with just 10.9% starch – easily digested and palatable for fussy feeders. Just one or 2 cups per day can make a significant difference in your horses condition! Key-3 oil is also a great option for additional calories!Click HERE to read more about Key-Plus and request a FREE sample! The Keyflow Advice and Support Teamkeyflowfeeds.com01672 519000advice@keyflowfeeds.com Morgan Mackenzie with Spartan fed on Keyflow! Follow...

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    Find out what Barrel Racer JJ Bracey has been up to!

    on Apr 1, 2021 in JJ Bracey, Riders blog | Comments Off on Find out what Barrel Racer JJ Bracey has been up to!

    Find out what Barrel Racer JJ Bracey has been up to!

    Hi guys! Things have been super busy here as we are getting ready to head into the 2021 rodeo season. Its already looking like it’s going to be 10x better than last years season (which was heavily restricted due to covid-19) as we have dates coming out left right and centre, the first rodeo of the season being in April. In the meantime, I have been busy working my project, client, and personal horses and managing my time between them. I’ve been organising my calendar for the year and the waiting list for client horses. Last year I was so busy with client horses that I didn’t have as much time for my personal horses so this year I want to be able to manage my time between them all alot better. So far, so good! With all the rain that we got in February, we now have beautiful green grass everywhere out bush, on neighbouring station land that we are very blessed to be able to put our horses on for the wet season. The green grass is such a beautiful sight after years of drought with little to no grass. We bushed two of our big herds earlier this year and its safe to say they are very happy!  My beautiful barrel saddle from one of my sponsors Western World is arriving from NZ in a few weeks so I’m very excited for that, and I also received some personalized rodeo shirts amongst other beautiful caps and such from my other sponsors Territory Tuff.  In terms of my barrel horses, I’ve just pulled ‘Indy’ from out bush and she is being brought back into work now as she prepares for the season. It will be our first season together so I’m eager to see where we will go. Indy is a registered QH Palamino mare ‘Docs Golden Pistol’ standing at around 14.2hh.  My new mare has been busy learning the pattern and all the skills that she needs to become the perfect allrounder rodeo horse. She is showing a huge amount of potential and keeps hustling by the day. We have had some exciting advancements here, with our arena being set up this week and having brought a new truck for the season. Alongside the above, I have also been keeping myself occupied with my Australian Brumby Challenge Brumby ‘VBA Fiora’.  I’ve excitedly partnered up with TRNT Off the Track, and am now also branching into the retraining of off the track thoroughbreds. This is something I have been thinking about doing for a while now. The first OTTB ‘Amigo Mio’ arrived last weekend, we picked him up directly from the Darwin Racetrack and also met his trainer, who only wanted the best for him and was sad to see him go. The big boy is settling well into his new normal. He was quite eager to meet all the horses, dogs, and pigs (who he is still a bit unsure about 😆).  I think I have just about covered everything….I look forward to the next blog.  Follow...

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    “Tiny” Tim tells us more!

    on Mar 26, 2021 in Riders blog | Comments Off on “Tiny” Tim tells us more!

    “Tiny” Tim tells us more!

    Well hello everyone…. I wanted to start off my blog by telling how I got started in rodeo. My grandfather was a clown in the shrine circus. As a young child he would paint my face and take me under the big top with him. In 4H as a youngster one of my projects was clowning. The older I got I fell in love with rodeo. When I graduated high school I tried my hand at bareback bronc riding. Then by accident I volunteered to be a clown at a neighboring county’s fair and was tossed into the rodeo protecting kids in the bullriding. I took a shine to it and began “fighting” bulls protecting riders as they fell off or dismounted. After a brief 8 year stint as a fighter I took time to grow my family. When I decided to re-enter the rodeo world I was asked to entertain a crowd for a local bullriding and some people there thought I had talent, so I was cast into other rodeos that summer. I get to mix my grandfathers ability to make people laugh with my love for rodeo. To me there is no better feeling than seeing the kids smiling and laughing at my antics and parents laughing at jokes. It truly is amazing to brighten people’s day just getting to be goofy. I hope this article finds everyone well and healthy! “Tiny” Tim Follow...

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